Tahiti

4 out of 5 based on 1 customer rating
(1 customer review)

$34.99

IIllustration of box cover art, board tiles and playing tokens.

Your small island is peaceful and prosperous – so prosperous that your tribe has grown beyond its ability to sustain you! Fortunately, being a peaceful people you have chosen not to fight over what little there is. Instead, you set out in your seagoing Wa’a (canoe) to fish and gather crops from the many nearby islands. The fertility goddess Haumea has blessed these islands, and they are rich with fruits, vegetables, and spices. It is a matter of pride to collect the finest harvest for the village. Can you win the race against time and the sea, and prove that you are the best gatherer of all?

In Tahiti the goal is to collect crops (coconuts, taro, bananas, spice) and fish from the surrounding islands to score points with bonuses for making full sets and acquiring the most of their family favorites which are hidden from the other players. The game starts off with just your home island and its immediate neighboring islands. Players build up the archipelago of fertile islands with the guidance of Haumea for the first part of the game until all islands are in play. Players seed the islands each turn giving them some control over where crops replenish. Once the archipelago is formed, the late season is triggered when crops start becoming scarce, with players occasionally stopping an island from producing altogether. Although the late season may not be as good for crops, fishing becomes easier with bonuses given to the waters around some of the islands.

During all this the players travel by Wa’a from island to island using action points to collect the crops they want or can get to before the others take them. As the Wa’a fills, it becomes slower limiting the number of actions they have. There are also treacherous reefs around the islands that require you go around them or risk losing some of the crops aboard your Wa’a. At the end of the year, the one who most efficiently gathers food for their family wins.

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SKU: MNI5FS100 Category:

Product Description

Your small island is peaceful and prosperous – so prosperous that your tribe has grown beyond its ability to sustain you! Fortunately, being a peaceful people you have chosen not to fight over what little there is. Instead, you set out in your seagoing Wa’a (canoe) to fish and gather crops from the many nearby islands. The fertility goddess Haumea has blessed these islands, and they are rich with fruits, vegetables, and spices. It is a matter of pride to collect the finest harvest for the village. Can you win the race against time and the sea, and prove that you are the best gatherer of all?

In Tahiti the goal is to collect crops (coconuts, taro, bananas, spice) and fish from the surrounding islands to score points with bonuses for making full sets and acquiring the most of their family favorites which are hidden from the other players. The game starts off with just your home island and its immediate neighboring islands. Players build up the archipelago of fertile islands with the guidance of Haumea for the first part of the game until all islands are in play. Players seed the islands each turn giving them some control over where crops replenish. Once the archipelago is formed, the late season is triggered when crops start becoming scarce, with players occasionally stopping an island from producing altogether. Although the late season may not be as good for crops, fishing becomes easier with bonuses given to the waters around some of the islands.

During all this the players travel by Wa’a from island to island using action points to collect the crops they want or can get to before the others take them. As the Wa’a fills, it becomes slower limiting the number of actions they have. There are also treacherous reefs around the islands that require you go around them or risk losing some of the crops aboard your Wa’a. At the end of the year, the one who most efficiently gathers food for their family wins.

 

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Additional Information

Weight 2.4 lbs
Dimensions 8.5 x 8.5 x 2 in
Manufacturer recommended age

13 years and up

Publisher

Minion Games

Year

2012

1 review for Tahiti

  1. 4 out of 5

    :

    Tahiti: 2-4 Players, Ages 13+, Average Play Time = 45 Minutes

    The game components were sturdy and I had no trouble making out the various colors on the island tiles. Vinnie (11) and I enjoyed the art on the player boards and island tiles. The learning curve wasn’t too bad, though I had to read the manual a few times to understand how all of the game’s mechanics came together. While the game is easy to moderate in terms of difficulty, there’s a lot to consider during the many phases of the game. I can see where a new or casual player might be intimidated at first, though in most cases I can see that being overcome after the first few rounds of play. Once players get into the swing of things, they’ll be able to concentrate more on the strategy as opposed to how the game mechanics function.

    While the general idea behind the game is simple, there’s a lot to think about during a player’s turn. Which actions are the best to take right now? Should I load up my canoe to its full capacity (covering up rowers) and limit the number of actions I have on future turns until I unload the goods I’ve collected? Do I take the chance of going over a reef and possibly losing some or all of the goods I have in my canoe? Which direction should I move the Haumea pawn so that it would benefit me most? Should I collect resources of one type or should I collect one of each, as per the “harvest goods” rule? Players will be asking themselves these questions as they play, opening up the door for many different types of strategies to unfold. Just to name an example, some might keep their canoe at a lighter load to ensure that they can take three or four actions a turn while others might take the viewpoint that the more they load onto their canoe, the better.

    Scoring is another big factor in the way a player will develop his or her strategy. The favorite crops tile a player receives will tell them which goods will provide them with bonus points at the end of the game, should they get the most or second most of the goods in question. This might encourage players to pass up certain opportunities in favor of collecting the goods they’d need to ensure that they had the most. Players also score based on the number of goods they’ve collected of a particular type and score based on the number of complete sets they’ve managed to make. Since goods are plentiful early to mid-game and are rare toward the endgame (with the exception of fish, depending on the situation), there’s a bit of tension going on as players rush to score the particular goods that they may need to receive those bonuses.

    Vinnie had a fun time moving around and collecting resources. It took him a few rounds to fully understand how the game came together but once he did, he was quickly on his way to giving thought as to how to collecting resources of a particular type for scoring purposes. Watching him collect resources this way allowed me to guess as to what was on his hidden favorite crops tile, which opened the door for possible sniping…that is, going after those resources yourself to prevent someone else from getting them. I keep that kind of sneakiness to a minimum for the benefit of the kids, but other groups may exploit that mechanic to its fullest via bluffing and etc. If your group is a bit more hardcore, then prepare to have your wits and poker face ready.

    Overall, I found “Tahiti” to be a fun and engaging game. There are many ways to play the game in order to score points, and your strategies will change based on the layout of the board. This feature alone gives the game almost unlimited replayability. With the proper parental guidance, younger children will have the ability to play it too. There are a lot of little pieces, so keep pets and toddlers away, if it all possible. The game is currently being sold in various places for prices in the twenty dollar range (as of 3/6/13), which I believe is a fair price all things considered. If you’re looking for a good, light-hearted game to play on family game night, then “Tahiti” will fit the bill nicely.

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